An explanation of how poverty impacts the experience of individuals in young and middle adulthood

Psychology homework help

Poverty has a strong influence on the lives of adults. When an adult lives in poverty, the effects extend beyond that individual to all those who depend on the adult. The problem of poverty in the life of an adult becomes a family or community problem, and few social problems are more impactful than poverty.

As a social worker, you are likely to address the needs of clients whose adverse circumstances are strongly influenced by poverty. Increasing your understanding of poverty and its influence will equip to you to better understand and assist your clients.

As you read this week’s resources, select the theory of poverty that most resonates with you to address in your Discussion post for this week.

By Day 3

Post a Discussion that includes the following:

An explanation of how poverty impacts the experience of individuals in young and middle adulthood

A statement as to whether you think poverty is the result of cultural or individual. characteristics; provide support for your position

An answer to the following questions about the theory of poverty you selected:

What aspects of this theory would be most suitable for your practice? Why?

What aspects of this theory do you find problematic in terms of your knowledge of social work practice? Explain.

Learning Resources

Required Readings

Zastrow, C. H., & Kirst-Ashman, K. K. (2016). Understanding human behavior and the social environment (10th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Chapter 12, “Sociological Aspects of Young and Middle Adulthood” (pp. 549-616)

Plummer, S.-B., Makris, S., Brocksen S. (Eds.). (2014). Sessions: Case histories. Baltimore, MD: Laureate International Universities Publishing. [Vital Source e-reader].

“The Hernandez Family” (pp. 3–5)

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2013). Hernandez family: Episode 6 [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 3 minutes.

Accessible player –Downloads–Download Video w/CCDownload AudioDownload Transcript

Optional Resources

Use the link below to access the MSW home page, which provides resources for your social work program.

MSW home page

Sutin, A. R., & Costa, P. T. (2010). Reciprocal influences of personality and job characteristics across middle adulthood. Journal of Personality, 78(1), 257–288.

Whitbourne, S., K., Sneed, J. R., & Sayer, A. (2009). Psychosocial development from college through midlife: A 34-year sequential study. Developmental Psychology, 45(5), 1328–1340.

An analysis of the Hernandez family’s case based on the genogram including the following information.

Psychology homework help

As you have been exploring human behavior and the social environment, you have likely increased your awareness of the many biological, psychological, and sociological factors that affect individual behavior. Human relationships are complex, and social workers may find it difficult to keep these important interactions in mind when addressing a client’s needs. Murray Bowen (as cited in Zastrow & Kirst-Ashman, 2016, p. 595) developed the genogram, a tool to help social workers and other practitioners create a record of family relationships. Once a social worker creates a genogram for a client, he or she may refer to it when analyzing the client’s situation.

To prepare for this Assignment, become familiar with how to create a genogram, which is presented in this week’s resources. Also, review this week’s media about Juan and Elena Hernandez’s visit with their social worker.

By Day 7

Submit a 2- to 4-page paper that includes the following:

1. A genogram of the Hernandez family

2. An analysis of the Hernandez family’s case based on the genogram including the following information.

3. Identify an element of the Hernandez family’s case that may influence the way Juan and Elena Hernandez address their issue with the social worker.

4. Explain how the genogram you created might help you address the needs of the Hernandez family.

Required Readings

Zastrow, C. H., & Kirst-Ashman, K. K. (2016). Understanding human behavior and the social environment (10th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Chapter 12, “Sociological Aspects of Young and Middle Adulthood” (pp. 549-616)

Plummer, S.-B., Makris, S., Brocksen S. (Eds.). (2014). Sessions: Case histories. Baltimore, MD: Laureate International Universities Publishing. [Vital Source e-reader].

“The Hernandez Family” (pp. 3–5)

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2013). Hernandez family: Episode 6 [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 3 minutes.

Accessible player –Downloads–Download Video w/CCDownload AudioDownload Transcript

Optional Resources

Use the link below to access the MSW home page, which provides resources for your social work program.

MSW home page

Sutin, A. R., & Costa, P. T. (2010). Reciprocal influences of personality and job characteristics across middle adulthood. Journal of Personality, 78(1), 257–288.

Whitbourne, S., K., Sneed, J. R., & Sayer, A. (2009). Psychosocial development from college through midlife: A 34-year sequential study. Developmental Psychology, 45(5), 1328–1340.

 

Analyze the services a person with exceptionalities might require as he or she transitions through adolescence to adulthood.

Psychology homework help
Transitional Services

Transitional services are critical for helping children with exceptionalities to successfully complete their schooling and transition into adulthood. One of the more daunting transitions is from adolescence to adulthood because children no longer have regular access to the professionals they did during their school years.

Using the Internet, research transitional services available in your state. The Center for Parent Information and Resources offers a helpful Web site for researching various services. You may also use other reliable sources. The details of the CPIR Web site are as follows:

Center for Parent Information and Resources. (n.d.). State agencies addressing disabilities. Retrieved from http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/stateagencies/

Based on your research, address the following:

Analyze the services a person with exceptionalities might require as he or she transitions through adolescence to adulthood.

Evaluate the transitional services available for your state. Be sure to list the Web sites and names of the agencies providing these services.

Compare these to the services you listed as being desirable for a person with exceptionalities transitioning to adulthood.

Present an evaluation of the level of services available.

Describe your search for information about transitional services.

What kinds of difficulties did you encounter in locating the information you needed, if any?

What sources did you use?

How did you go about finding information?

Provide your recommendations for locating services needed for people with disabilities as they transition into adulthood and addressing the challenges associated with gathering information.

Write a 3–5-page paper in Word format. Be sure to include separate title and reference pages.

Explains the unique way the two symptom sets interact using the co-morbid pair chosen

Psychology homework help

*I only have to complete introduction and summary, the disorder chosen is depression* This should only be approximately 150 words for both intro and conclusion*

Prepare a 350- to 700-word summary of a disorder that typically co-occurs with Substance Abuse.

Discuss the clinical picture of substance abuse. Focus on co-morbidity in substance abuse disorders.

Explains the unique way the two symptom sets interact using the co-morbid pair chosen

Describes how researchers demonstrate co-morbidity among disorders

Discusses the ramifications of co-morbid disorders compared to a single diagnosis

Is treatment planning important and/or necessary in substance abuse counseling?

Psychology homework help
Psychology-LMHC
#1 DISCUSSION week 5 $10.00

Is treatment planning important and/or necessary in substance abuse counseling? Why or why not?
Is it important for treatment plan goals to be measurable? Why or why not? Provide an example of a treatment plan goal that is in fact measurable.
How do the stages of change relate to treatment planning?
#2: Overview and Objectives $10.00

The following article was published in MD Health.� It discusses the harmful consequences of smokeless tobacco.� All too often addictions counselors do not address issues such as smokeless tobacco (or gambling, for example).� In addition to the discussion question noted on the syllabus, please discuss your understanding of smokeless tobacco as an addiction and ideas you have about how you would approach it clinically with a client.�

Smokeless tobacco poses a cardiovascular risk

October 6, 2004 By Doug Kaufman

1. LOUIS (MD Consult) – The cardiovascular risks of cigarette smoking are well known, as are the oral cancer risks of using smokeless tobacco. But a paper published in the September 27, 2004 Archives of Internal Medicine sheds new light on the cardiovascular risks of smokeless tobacco. “It’s not as harmless as it might seem,” said lead author Dr. Ritesh Gupta of the Cardiology Department at the University of Alabama School of Medicine. Dr. Gupta and colleagues Dr. Hitinder Gurm and Dr. John R. Bartholomew reviewed previously published studies about smokeless tobacco when all three were at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. The impetus was a case they saw at the clinic. “We got interested in the fact that there’s not much information out there looking at smokeless tobacco and cardiovascular risk,” he said. “We wanted to explore that in greater detail and see what’s actually been published and bring it out for everybody to share.”

They did an extensive case and literature review of all medical articles about smokeless tobacco published since 1965. “To our surprise, there’s quite a dearth of sound clinical research in this area of public importance,” he said. “So, we wanted to highlight that and bring out everything that had been done so far, so you could go to one source and get all the information to build on with further research.” Cigarette smoking has a well-established link to cardiovascular risk, with multiple studies finding “almost a causal relationship between cardiovascular mortality and smoking,” Dr. Gupta said. “Such has not been the case with smokeless tobacco.”

However, studies examining such cardiovascular risk factors as hypertension, diabetes and lipid levels have noted risks involving smokeless tobacco. For instance, smokeless tobacco increases blood pressure. “(Smokeless tobacco) increases systolic pressure by about 21 millimeters of mercury, which is quite significant, and increases diastolic blood pressure by up to 14 millimeters of mercury – again, quite significant. It can increase the heart rate up to 19 beats per minute. Again, quite significant.”

— Dr. Ritesh Gupta �

“It increases systolic pressure by about 21 millimeters of mercury, which is quite significant, and increases diastolic blood pressure by up to 14 millimeters of mercury – again, quite significant,” Dr. Gupta said. “It can increase the heart rate up to 19 beats per minute. Again, quite significant.” The long-term risks, particularly when the relationship between smokeless tobacco and hypertension is considered, haven’t been as consistent. “In healthy volunteers, it’s been seen that maybe it doesn’t affect blood pressure as much as it does in certain other patients who are more likely to develop blood pressure (problems),” he said. “Similarly, looking at the lipid profile, we have found there are conflicting reports in the literature. But overall, it seems that use of smokeless tobacco is associated with the worst lipid profile, including 2.5 times adjusted risk for hypercholesteremia, or total cholesterol greater than 240.” Studies have also found, Dr. Gupta said, that people using at least 150 grams of smokeless tobacco a week have a three-fold greater risk of developing diabetes.

“These are all studies that have been published elsewhere,” he said. “We were able to compile all this and present it in a fashion that would lead to further research and give anybody interested in the subject an avenue to look at, in totality.”

A Swedish study of approximately 135,000 patients, conducted between 1971 and 1974, reached some interesting conclusions. The study divided patients into three groups – ex-smokers currently using smokeless tobacco, cigarette smokers and non-tobacco users.

“There was no follow-up done on these patients, so there’s always the possibility of some crossover,” Dr. Gupta said. “But what they found from this study was there was a 1.4 times (greater) risk of cardiovascular mortality in patients who used smokeless tobacco, compared to non-users. That’s a very important finding in itself. The study is limited in its methodology, but it does give us a very important insight into some of the adverse cardiovascular profile that can be associated with just smokeless tobacco use.” Smokeless tobacco has a well-established causative link to oral cancer, cancer of the larynx, cancer of the esophagus and many other body organs, Dr. Gupta said. “That’s a known fact,” he said. “The 1986 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services report indicated there was a 50-fold increase in the relative risk of oral cancers in smokeless tobacco users compared to controls – people who did not use any form of tobacco product. Those are really telling figures. We need to bring to the forefront that use of smokeless tobacco is not as harmless as some people think it might be. It may be a little less risky to use smokeless tobacco compared to cigarette smoking, but definitely it’s much more than people who do not use any form of tobacco products.”

Doctors should be aware of the risks represented by smokeless tobacco. “We physicians are very good at taking the history of smoking, of cigarette intake, very seriously,” Dr. Gupta said. “But when it comes to other tobacco products, I think what’s lacking is mainly awareness in terms of the use, in terms of quantifying the use, and also in terms of what kind of risk factors it (involves). We also found certain research showing that use of smokeless tobacco may be an indication for use of cigarettes in later years.”

There is a “disturbing trend” of marketing smokeless tobacco to the youth of our country.

— Dr. Ritesh Gupta��

There is also a “disturbing trend” of marketing smokeless tobacco to the youth of our country, he said. “People are starting to use smokeless tobacco at earlier ages,” he said.One study of about 400 teenagers between the ages of 12 and 18 found that 12.7 percent of them had used smokeless tobacco in the last month, and four percent of them became regular users over a four-year follow-up period, Dr.Gupta said. “So that is a very telling statistic,” he said. “It brings to point … that people who are using smokeless tobacco at a very early age are more likely to start using smokeless tobacco on a regular basis. We know for a fact that it’s harmful, and some of these people may end up using cigarette smoking as another form of tobacco intake.” Physicians need to encourage patients who use smokeless tobacco to quit. Nicotine replacement therapy, behavioral interventions such as telephone counseling and self-help manuals, group therapy and sustained-release bupropion have all proven effective in helping people stop a smokeless tobacco habit, he said. “We just need to counsel patients more aggressively to seek these therapies,” Dr. Gupta said.

Related Information Story List Core Collection Journal Articles

Reducing tobacco use among youth. Heyman RB – Pediatr Clin North Am – 01-APR-2002; 49(2): 377-87

>From NIH/NLM MEDLINE

Treating tobacco use and dependence: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for tobacco cessation. Anderson JE – Chest – 01-MAR-2002; 121(3): 932-41

>From NIH/NLM MEDLINE

Health effects associated with smokeless tobacco: a systematic review.

Critchley JA – Thorax – 01-MAY-2003; 58(5): 435-43

>From NIH/NLM MEDLINE

Smokeless tobacco and cardiovascular disease. Asplund K – Prog Cardiovasc Dis – 01-MAR-2003; 45(5): 383-94

Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. www.mdconsult.com (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

Bookmark URL:

/das/stat/view/41544960-2/mnfp?nid=147743&sid=0&pos=3&date=week

PLEASE PLEASE follow Professors comments, it is a Men and Women Groups no specific topic. Or Women only.

This is not a theoretical paper, no references. It is the application of your experience at your site. Write from the “I” perspective. Notice the prompts include “What will you do when…” “What are your site’s specific…” and “What are your responsibilities…” notice the prompts are about you not theoretical. It appears you were not able to clearly cover the prompts due to writing from a theoretical perspective instead of an applied “I” perspective. Remember it is 3-4 full content page paper. Content closely related to the prompts. At times the writing is unclear. The Writing Center is available to you, information in syllabus.

#3 Crisis Intervention & Workplace Violence Prevention $10.00

What types of crisis intervention do you (or will you) perform at your site?

What will you do when a client expresses suicidal ideation? Homicidal ideation? Child abuse? Elder abuse?

What are your site’s specific safety plans/protocols in case of various crises (ie. suicidal/homicidal ideation, etc.)?

What are your responsibilities when those safety plan/protocols are initiated?

#4 Clinical Documentation $10.00

What are your various documentation responsibilities at your site? What are some of the easiest aspects of documentation?

What are some of the difficult aspects of documentation?

Include a de-identified example of your documentation in this week’s paper (e.g., progress note, treatment plan

Post a brief explanation of the means-tested programs that might be available to Eboni.

Psychology homework help

What is welfare? When you hear the word “welfare,” do you picture images of individuals who are facing hard times? While there is more than one type of social program available in the United States to those who need it, social welfare programs like TANF provide assistance to families in need through government tax revenues. Programs like these are often referred to as “public assistance” or “means-tested programs.” These programs have eligibility criteria that are based on the individual’s or the family’s household income and assets. Do these types of programs exist in your state or region? If so, what are the criteria? If you encountered a client like Eboni Logan, from the Logan Family video, who soon will become a mother, how might you best assist her in obtaining benefits from these types of programs?

For this Discussion, review this week’s resources, including the Logan Family video case. Consider the means-tested programs that might be available to her in your state or region. Then, think about the likely long-term outcomes for Eboni and her child, if she chooses to parent. Finally, reflect on the state welfare policies that might help her manage the responsibilities of parenthood.

By Day 3

Post a brief explanation of the means-tested programs that might be available to Eboni. Be sure your answer is specific to the means-tested programs available in your state or region. Then, explain the potential long-term outcomes for Eboni and her child, if she chooses to parent. Finally, explain the state public assistance policies that might help Eboni manage the responsibilities of parenthood.

Learning Resources

Note: To access this week’s required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.

Required Readings

Popple, P. R., & Leighninger, L. (2015). The policy-based profession: An introduction to social welfare policy analysis for social workers. (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

Chapter 6, “Fighting poverty: Temporary Assistance to Needy Families” (pp. 101-138)

Bentele, K. G., & Nicoli, L. T. (2012). Ending access as we know it: State welfare benefit coverage in the TANF era. Social Service Review, 86(2), 223–268.

Note: Retrieved from Walden Library databases.

Posiniewski, L. (2011). A unique approach to meeting the employment and training needs of food stamp recipients. Policy & Practice, 69(2), 14–15.

Note: Retrieved from Walden Library databases.

Plummer, S. -B., Makris, S., & Brocksen, S. (Eds.). (2014). Sessions: Case histories. Baltimore: MD: Laureate International Universities Publishing. [Vital Source e-reader].

Part 1, “The Logan Family” (pp. 9–10)

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. (n.d.). Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation. Retrieved November 14, 2013, from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/research

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2013). Sessions: Logan family (Episode 4 of 42) [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu

Accessible player –Downloads–Download Video w/CCDownload AudioDownload Transcript

Autism Spectrum Disorder Among Children

Psychology homework help

Autism Spectrum Disorder Among Children

Autism spectrum disorder is an extremely common developmental disorder that impacts communication and behavior. This disorder can be very challenging for anyone who has it and the disorder increases psychological issues. According to Helgeson (2017) “mental health, in particular depression, is clearly an important problem in our country”(p.633).

Research suggests autism spectrum disorder is more prevalent in males than females. Current findings prove more males are diagnosed with the disorder. Professionals analyze behavior and development to determine whether or not a child may have autism. There are no medical or even blood tests that can prove if someone has autism spectrum disorder.

Since the disorder impacts behaviors, communication and interactions, many children with autism have a great chance of experiencing mental health concerns. A child with higher level of functioning could develop anxiety due to knowing the disorder is impacting daily communication and interactions. Most children with the disorder need more attention in the academic setting, which could increase anxiety and other negative emotions. Behavioral and education therapy is the best treatment for a child diagnosed with autism.

Reference:

Helgeson, V. S. (2017). Psychology of gender (5th ed.). New York, NY: Taylor and Francis.

How would information gathered from the MMPI-2-RF assist in the intake and treatment planning process?

Psychology homework help

Address and include the following in your PowerPoint:

A title, introduction, and conclusion slide.

What is the MMPI-2-RF and what does it measure?

What are the legal and ethical requirements for a professional to administer, interpret, and/or report the results of an MMPI-2-RF?

How would information gathered from the MMPI-2-RF assist in the intake and treatment planning process?

Describe potential treatment strategies that would likely be incorporated into a treatment plan based on results from an MMPI-2-RF.

Include speaker notes below each content-related slide that represent what would be said if giving the presentation in person. Expand upon the information included in the slide and do not simply restate it. Please ensure the speaker notes include a minimum of 50 words.

A reference slide with a minimum of four scholarly references in addition to the textbook.

Does the Freudian perspective indicate that Steve’s relationships with women are internally or externally motivated?

Psychology homework help

Assignment 1

After reading the attached case study answer the following questions based on Freudian theory.

75 points

Assignment 2

Briefly Explain Sigmund Freud’s Psychoanalysis

Briefly Explain the theory that make the most sense to you in treating patients (cognitive, behavioral, REBT, etc.)

Briefly Explain Treatment for Anxiety disorders

Briefly Explain Treatment for Bi-Polar disorder

Sigmund Freud Case Study

QUESTIONS

1. Does the Freudian perspective indicate that Steve’s relationships with women are internally or externally motivated?

2. According to Freud, which state of consciousness is most involved in controlling Steve’s behavior?

3. Which component (id, ego, superego) of the personality structure is most involved in determining Steve’s behavior? Give an example(s) to support your answer.

4. At which stage of psychosexual development is Steve most likely fixated? Give an example(s) to support your answer.

CASE STUDY

Steve is sitting at a restaurant table waiting for his date to come bac from the restroom, As he waits, he imagines what the rest of the evening will be like. The restaurant they are eating at is one of those little Italian places with red-and-white checkered tablecloths and candles in Chianti bottles. A violin player strolls around the tables playing romantic music. Steve considers that these types of restaurants always work well for him. His date would be charmed by the atmosphere and begin to feel romantic. This would allow Steve to make his move, and typically, he and his date would end up at either his apartment or hers for a night of great sex.

Steve is 38, of Italian-American descent, and single: a bachelor by choice, but his friends worry about his happiness. They wonder if Steve is unable to form a long-term relationship, that he has a fear of commitment and an addiction to sex and the passion that marks the beginning of relationships. They also wonder whether Steve’s strained relationship with his mother is at least partly to blame for his behavior. Steve’s mother, while caring for his physical needs, was not openly affectionate and did not give Steve the demonstrative affection and loving interaction he craved. They wonder if his anger toward her and her negligent behavior toward Steve is being manifested as anger toward women in general.

Steve has been a flirt ever since puberty. In high school, he had a reputation for insincerity. Girls were attracted to him; he was handsome and spent a lot of time and money on his appearance. Unbeknownst to his friends, however, Steve secretly feared that he was unattractive, so he did what he could to improve his looks.

The girls he asked out always had a good time on their dates, but it soon became known that he would always pressure his dates for sex and, in many cases, tell them that he loved them to convince them to have sex. He was also rumored to have made one girl pregnant and then claimed that it was not his child. To his close male friends, he said that she was not going to tie him down, that “there were too many women and not enough time.” This pattern of relationships continued during college. He would date women, have sex with them a few times, and then break off the relationship. He estimated that by the time he was 21, he had sex with about eight dozen women. He bragged about this among his male friends.

After college, and through the present time, Steve also continued to form relationships with women that were based on sexual attraction and nothing more substantial. One by one, he watched his male friends settle down and commit to one woman. Every time this happened, he would express astonishment and disbelief, stating that his friends were being duped and that no one would make him live with one woman for the rest of his life. When women agreed to go out with him or go to bed with him, Steve felt attractive, and no one was going to take that away from him. In fact, Steve secretly feared that no woman would find him attractive enough to marry. He believed that these women went out with him initially to get a free meal and would soon want to break up with him when someone better came around. So, he broke up with them first.

His friends believed that Steve’s latest sexual interest, Diane, would be the one he would marry. She seemed to be all that any man could hope for. She was pretty, smart, caring, and had a good sense of humor. Steve had been dating her for a longer time than he typically dated women, and his friends thought that he was finally growing up and settling down. As it turns out, the relationship lasted longer than usual because she was reluctant to have sex with him. She finally did after a couple of months when she was convinced that Steve really loved her and was not just using her for sex. Unfortunately, Diane should have trusted her initial instincts. Steve broke up with her after they had sex on three different occasions.

His present date was a woman he met at the gym where he worked out. She was very attractive, with a great body. He used to date women he met at work, but after someone accused him of sexual harassment, he decided to no longer date women from work. He was angered by the specific accusation and the hype associated with sexual harassment in general. A man just couldn’t follow his instincts anymore without the possibility of losing his job. At least he could still meet women at other places.

What is the role of the information and news media in the shaping of political opinions?

Psychology homework help

Imagine you are a news editor. You have been asked to respond to an online discussion thread regarding how information media has affected American culture.

Answer each of the following questions in 100 to 150 words:

Does the information media have social responsibility? If yes, in what ways? If not, why not?

What is the role of the information and news media in the shaping of political opinions?

How have electronic media and their convergence transformed journalism and news consumption

How are standards in journalism still relevant and important in today’s media, opinion, and media-saturated world

What role does satire have in the news today? How have programs and websites such as The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, and The Onion provided a separate space for commentary on the news and news providers?